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Thursday, 04 November 2010 01:01

Updated free guide to invasive plants in southern forests

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Gardeners, foresters, landowners and others concerned about nonnative invasive plants in the South can now get free copies of A Field Guide for the Identification of Invasive Plants in Southern Forests by U.S. Forest Service Research Ecologist Jim Miller.

The long-awaited book is an update of the very popular Nonnative Invasive Plants of Southern Forests: A Field Guide for Identification and Control, published in 2003.

“Jim Miller is one of the foremost authorities on invasive plants in the South, so we’re delighted to offer this enhanced field guide at no cost to anyone interested in learning about and identifying invasive plants in the region,” said Forest Service Souther Research Station Director Jim Reaves. “The Forest Service has distributed nearly 160,000 copies of Jim’s first book on invasive plants, and with the spread of exotic species across region, we expect there will be even more demand for this expanded version.”

The book’s appendix contains the most complete list of nonnative invasive plants in the 13 Southern states, providing common and scientific names for 310 other invading species including, for the first time, aquatic plant invaders. Also, the authors updated the “Sources of Identification Information” section to include the latest books, manuals and articles on invasive plants. The ever-expanding website section lists Internet resources that provide useful information on identification and efficient management.

To request a copy, send name and complete mailing address, along with book title, author, and publication number (GTR-SRS-119) to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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