Thu11272014

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Outdoor Latest

Wednesday, 26 November 2014 16:48

Explore National Parks from the fireside

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With short and chilly days making miles on the trail harder to come by, a lineup of outdoors-themed board games can be a more attractive choice. Check out one of these games that entertain while celebrating the best parts of WNC’s public land:
Wednesday, 26 November 2014 16:47

AT license plates to fund trail-related projects

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Projects that promote or protect the Appalachian Trail can tap a special pot of grant money thanks to the sale of specialty AT license plates. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy dedicates a portion of the proceeds from AT license plates to trail-related projects in communities along the AT, from trail programs in schools to trail maintenance projects by local hiking clubs.
Land Trust for the Little Tennessee is looking to raise money for its Kids in the Creek program as part of #GivingTuesday on Dec. 2, an effort of charities around the world designed to inspire people to take action to improve their local communities, give back to causes they support and help create a better world.
Wednesday, 26 November 2014 16:44

Hunting and fishing resources for disabled sportsmen

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A directory of handicapped-accessible hunting and fishing sites in the Nantahala and Pisgah national forests is available to help disabled hunters and hikers continue to enjoy the outdoors.  The U.S. Forest Service has fact sheets available for each of the state’s four national forests available online at www.fs.usda.gov/nfsnc via the “hunt” and “fish” links at the top of the page. 
Wednesday, 26 November 2014 16:43

Canton Library garden wins state award

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The Canton Library’s Giving Garden got some state recognition by nabbing the “best adult program” award from the North Carolina Public Library Directors Association. The garden was the backdrop for a variety of programs at the Canton library throughout the year, including several gardening talks, author visits and workshops. The harvest from the garden goes to those in need.
Things have gone well for the Smokies elk, and they’ve risen from reintroduction experiment to established population. But meanwhile, they’ve outgrown Great Smoky Mountains National Park, spilling over into private lands to find pasture on agricultural fields not intended as gifts to the elk. A land protection project by The Conservation Fund seeks to provide some more suitable places for the elk to go.  “The reason…