fr waterfowlThere’s been a noticeable decline in the number of ducks and geese at Lake Junaluska since a feeding ban went into effect last fall.

art frIn Western North Carolina, it seems the two most important things are tradition and family – and nothing incorporates those ideals more than the melodic music of Southern Appalachian.

“Music is a huge part of our heritage and of our lives here,” said musician Caleb Smith. “You go to a barn dance or play on your front porch, it’s something to be proud of. Bluegrass and mountain music may not be the biggest genre, but it’s authentic. It’s music that makes an impact on people.”

fr buyhaywoodThe “Buy Haywood” initiative is a work-in-progress example of how local businesses benefit by connecting with each other.

Haywood County’s budget will increase by more than $2 million next fiscal year, but it will still be nearly that amount shy of the county’s pre-recession budget.

fr haircutIt’s got more names than the Bible. The “round-over,” the “lollipop,” and the “bob” to name a few. No matter how you call it, Haywood County’s favorite way of trimming trees is despised by tree experts, yet it’s probably here to stay.

Members of the nationally acclaimed bluegrass band Balsam Range are now the bona fide ambassadors of Haywood County.

fr oneloveThis summer, there will be a new scent wafting through Lake Junaluska.

Ghost Town in the Sky did not open to much fanfare last weekend because, simply put, it didn’t open.

coverMaggie Valley’s slow and steady decline as a tourist destination comes down to aesthetics, a consultant hired to assess Maggie Valley’s economic challenges told town leaders last week.  

Maggie Valley’s appearance has declined and not kept up with the more sophisticated tastes of today’s tourists, according to his assessment. 

Since the advent of the Great Smoky Mountains Railroad, tourists flocking to Bryson City and Dillsboro to ride the scenic passenger train have been the envy of neighboring communities.

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