Displaying items by tag: nonprofit

The mental health system in North Carolina can use all the help it can get as it struggles with cuts in state funding, an increase in the demand of services and a shortage of local rural providers.

A major fundraising campaign is a significant undertaking for any nonprofit organization, but it’s especially difficult when an organization has to split its time between providing behavioral health services in seven western counties and trying to come up with enough funding to keep its programming.

Every year the Franklin Town Council struggles to meet the needs of the community with only $40,000 to spend on nonprofit requests.

Cold temperatures have arrived, but efforts to ensure the future of Jackson Neighbors in Need are heating up. 

Fourteen Macon County charities are vying for a piece of Franklin’s $40,000 nonprofit funding pool, but not all organizations will walk away with their full request. 

fr utilitiesWaynesville utility crews will no longer donate labor to run power, water and sewer connections for community projects on a handshake agreement.

out frThe wilderness is where one can find peace and clarity while also finding inner strength and determination. 

That is the basis for Radical Inclusion, a new nonprofit formed by Waynesville couple Nicole Taylor and Jess Dunlap to provide an affordable summer camp experience for youth while teaching them survival skills.

fr storywalkFranklin will soon be joining other communities around the world who are incorporating a love for reading with a love of the outdoors.

maconEach year, Macon County organizations stand before the Franklin Board of Aldermen to ask for a piece of the nonprofit grant funding the town sets aside in the budget.

op frI should get over being astounded by the way the world works. And I’m talking about the good stuff, not the negative.

The package of stories that graced the cover of The Smoky Mountain News last week, “The Golden Children,” is almost allegorical in its arc. Staff writer Holly Kays traveled to an orphanage in a remote part of Bolivia to help do some construction work and spend time with the children. Her reporting about the orphanage — named Kory Wawanaca, which means “Golden Children” — its founder, Carrie Blackburn Brown, and the connection to Western North Carolina and particularly Haywood County, is so touching that it could never be scripted because it would come off as too heartwarming, too many people doing the right thing for all the right reasons.

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