A biological journey through history down the Little Tennessee

out coweemoundA guided trip down the Little Tennessee River aims to teach paddlers about the area’s cultural and biological history and follow the route of William Bartram, a naturalist who traveled the river in 1775.

The trip will depart at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, June 15, from the Great Smoky Mountain Fish Camp and Safari in Franklin and end at 5 p.m.

The excursion will be led by Brent Martin, historian, naturalist and regional director of The Wilderness Society, and Patricia Kyritsi Howell, herbalist and author of Medicinal Plants of the Southern Appalachians. 

Along a seven-mile stretch of the river, north of Franklin, the duo will talk about local plants, herbs, the Cowee mound and other Cherokee sites. The section of river winds through miles of riparian forests and farmland. There will also be stops along the way and opportunities to swim. The trip is suitable for those with some recent paddling experience. The cost is $100 per person and space is limited so registration is required.

706.746.5485 or www.wildhealingherbs.com.

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