Peace, love and bugs in Cherokee

Volkswagen devotees make their way to Cherokee, Aug. 13 - 15 for the second annual VW Show at the Cherokee Event Center on Aquoni Road. Volkswagens of all makes and models will be on display, and all registered vehicles are eligible to win cash prizes and may compete for Best of Show in the best van, best car, best three wheeler and best dune buggy as well as a People’s Choice categories. Deal of Asheville, Asheville’s area Volkswagen dealer, will be on hand all weekend to demo Volkswagen’s latest offerings, answer questions, and share in some vintage VW tales.

“This year we’re asking all participants to bring a daisy or two to the VW Show. We will collect the daisies, make an obviously enormous bouquet and deliver it to Ambassador Said T. Jawad of the Embassy of Afghanistan in Washington D.C. as a symbol to encourage peace among all people of the world,” said Mary Jane Ferguson, director of marketing for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Members of Cherokee’s Travel and Promotion Department will collect the flowers at the Cherokee Event Center throughout the weekend, preserve them and prepare the bouquet for shipping to Washington D.C.

Gates open Fri., Aug. 13 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to noon, with the awards program at 11 a.m. Vehicle registration is $10 and includes two free passes to the show. All registered vehicles are eligible to participate in the cash drawings on Saturday and Best in Show competition on Sunday. General admission is $5 daily. Vendors are welcome, and may register for a 10 x 20 space for $50. More information and registration forms are available online at

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