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Grants benefit Cherokee arts

Cherokee Preservation Foundation recently awarded 25 new grants totaling nearly $3.2 million. Here are a few targeting the arts:

• A $600,000 grant was awarded to Cherokee Historical Association to complete stair and handicapped access upgrades and install new seats at the Mountainside Theatre, and to improve the Onconaluftee Indian Village by constructing a children’s learning center, creating a new outdoor market for craft sales, and renovating village dwellings. A separate $20,000 grant will enable CHA to develop a new Village Guide and Theatre Training program modeled after a program utilized by Colonial Williamsburg to train their guides to be certified historical interpreters.

• A $95,000 grant will support the continuation of the Festival of Native Peoples, a culture-based event featuring performers and artisans from tribes across the United States, Canada and Mexico.

• A $6,800 grant has been awarded to Cherokee High School so students can participate in a summer program to learn how to harvest, process and dye river cane basket materials.

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