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Burn ban lifted in WNC

A burn ban enacted April 3 on 32 Western North Carolina counties has been lifted following heavy rainfall this weekend.

Burn permits are now available on all these counties, but the N.C. Forest Service is urging residents to reconsider burning yard debris through the end of May, as careless debris burning is the leading cause of wildfires in North Carolina.

“It is important to remember that we are still in the midst of spring wildfire season and the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “Preventing escaped debris burns is something each of us can do to protect our communities and our first responders.”

Burn permits are being issued online only while NCFS office locations remain temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All burn permits previously granted for the 32 counties affected by this burn ban were canceled when the ban became effective. New burn permit applications must be submitted online at www.ncforestservice.gov/burnpermit.

The ban had applied to Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Iredell, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Union, Watauga, Wilkes and Yancey counties.

A burn ban previously enacted in the Pisgah and Nantahala national forests remains in effect.

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