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My wife likes to use stevia for baking as well as cold and hot tea but I can’t stand the taste – it tastes bitter to me, almost like licorice! What’s going on?

Stevia, also known as “sweet leaf” comes from a plant. We have receptors on our tongue to detect different flavors. There are actually 25 receptors that will detect bitter flavors, and two of those receptors specifically detect the bitter aftertaste of stevia. The ability to determine certain tastes is a genetic predisposition. For example, to some cilantro tastes “soapy” and unpleasant, and to others a good salsa must have lots of cilantro. 

Sources:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120531102334.htm

https://www.phillymag.com/be-well-philly/2013/08/22/study-fake-sweeteners-taste-disgusting-people/

Leah McGrath, RDN, LDN

Ingles Markets Corporate Dietitian

twitter.com/InglesDietitian

facebook.com/LeahMcgrathDietitian

800-334-4936

 

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